Careers

Fellowship Experiences

Paul Schmit

Paul Schmit

2013 Truman Fellow

Paul received his B.S. in physics in 2007 from Arizona State University's Tempe campus. He earned his Ph.D. in plasma physics in 2012 from Princeton University, where he was a National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellow focused on the physics of waves embedded within hot plasmas undergoing rapid compression or expansion.

Paul’s emphasis on kinetic physics and wave–particle interactions enabled him to discover a mechanism for using waves as a switch to drive energetic beams and current, a process to enhance the performance of plasma-based particle accelerators, and many effects illuminating the basic science associated with wave dynamics in non-stationary media. His work has resulted in 12 peer-reviewed journal articles, including 5 in Physical Review Letters. He also received the 2013 IEEE Nuclear and Plasma Science Society Outstanding Student in Plasma Science Award.

In November 2012, Paul began his term as a Truman Fellow in Sandia's Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Design Division. During his fellowship, Paul intends to use his background in kinetic plasma physics to shed new light on physics issues faced by the ICF community.

"The Truman Fellowship facilitates the best combination of vital learning experiences, formal mentorship, and research opportunities for the ambitious post-graduate scientist. By providing ample intellectual freedom, unlimited access to vast supercomputing resources, encouragement to develop collaborations, and funding for high-risk research activities, Sandia has done an exceptional job of removing any obstacles that could obstruct a Fellow's rapid scientific growth and development as a principal investigator. I have no doubt that these three years will be some of my most productive as I find new and creative ways to support Sandia's vital national security mission."

Christina Ting

Christina Ting

2013 Truman Fellow

Christina graduated in 2007 from the University of Texas at Austin with a B.S. in biochemistry. She earned her Ph.D. in biochemistry and molecular biophysics in 2012 from the California Institute of Technology, where she completed a Sandia Campus Executive graduate research project from 2011 to 2012.

Christina's research interests span the fields of biophysics and materials science. By creating models that capture the essential physics and applying—or in some cases, developing—the appropriate computational methodologies, she aims to predict macroscopic properties from molecular interactions. Her research has resulted in six refereed publications in journals such as Physical Review Letters and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA.

As a Truman Fellow, Christina's research focuses on uncovering insights to help guide the design of functional, bio-inspired materials under development at Sandia. Christina began working at Sandia in November 2012 in the Materials Science and Engineering Division and is being mentored by Amalie Frischknecht.

"The Truman Fellowship offers an unparalleled opportunity to conduct independent research on problems of the national interest. The availability of world-class scientists and extensive computing resources at Sandia has provided an opportunity to solve challenging problems in a stimulating and collaborative environment."